Dem Governor Signs Extreme Green Energy Mandate

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer recently signed a set of energy bills that position the state at the forefront of stringent energy mandates in the U.S. The legislation, championed by Democrats, sets ambitious targets for utility providers to achieve a full transition to carbon-free energy generation by 2040. This initiative requires 50% renewable energy by 2030, increasing to 60% by 2035, and ultimately reaching 100% by the end of the next decade.

Whitmer celebrated the bills as a significant move towards clean energy, promising job creation, reduced utility costs, and an average savings of $145 per year for Michigan residents. However, the plan drew mixed reactions. While some environmental activists critiqued the inclusion of carbon capture technology and expressed concerns about its impact on marginalized communities, Republicans criticized the mandate for its potential to ban natural gas and its extensive land use requirements for renewable energy.

Michigan Senate Minority Leader Aric Nesbitt warned that the legislation could exacerbate the state’s power outage issues and increase reliance on renewable energy, potentially compromising electricity reliability. Furthermore, Nesbitt highlighted concerns over the “industrialization” of Michigan farmland, with over 350,000 new acres needed for renewable energy, potentially overriding local land use decisions.

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy’s analysis suggested that the green energy mandate could cost residents an additional $2,746 annually while delivering less reliable electricity. Republican House Floor Leader Bryan Posthumus also cautioned about higher costs and reduced reliability due to the mandates, criticizing Governor Whitmer’s approach as politically motivated and dismissive of other viable energy options.

In Marquette Township, residents expressed frustration with Democratic Representative Jenn Hill’s support for the mandate, with local leaders like Forsyth Township Supervisor Joe Boogren pointing out unanswered questions and concerns related to the energy transition.

Author: Steven Sinclaire

Most Popular

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More



Most Popular
Sponsored Content

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More